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3 edition of Nilo-Saharan language studies found in the catalog.

Nilo-Saharan language studies

Nilo-Saharan language studies

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Published by African Studies Center, Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nilo-Saharan languages

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 355-373.

    Statementedited by M. Lionel Bender.
    SeriesMonograph / Committee on Northeast African Studies ;, no. 13, Monograph (Michigan State University. Committee on Northeast African Studies) ;, no. 13.
    ContributionsBender, M. Lionel 1934-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPL8026.N49 N53 1983
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 374 p. :
    Number of Pages374
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3002941M
    LC Control Number84622093

      Anthropological studies have benefited from quantitative evaluation, particularly kinship, which is newly appreciated for its application to all social sciences. The chapters of this book, some original works by the contributors and some unpublished Hage material, attest to the importance of the continual study of : Hardcover. Kabba belongs to the Western-Sara group of the Central-Sudanic branch of the Nilo-Saharan languages (80, speakers in the North of C.A.R., 20, in Chad and Cameroon). The grammar consists of ten chapters and is followed by a complete and interlinearised traditional folkstory told by Daniel Tambe.

    The book covers languages from the Afro-Asiatic and Nilo-Saharan languages of Africa and of the North America Pacific Northwest and Pacific regions. Corinna Handschuh, University of Regensburg Corinna Handschuh () studied Linguistics, Sociology and Media Studies in Düsseldorf. Gerrit J. Dimmendaal holds a Ph.D. in Arts from Leiden University, the Netherlands, and is Professor of African Studies at the University of Cologne, Germany. He has published monographs and articles on African languages belonging to three different phyla, Afroasiatic, Nilo-Saharan, and : Gerrit J. Dimmendaal.

    The more than languages belonging to Nilo-Saharan are spread over a vast area, covering major parts of East and Central Africa. Whereas some members of this phylum have extensive systems of derivational morphology, others tend to use compounding as a main strategy. Apart from affixation, these languages also use tone, ATR shift, and vowel and consonant alternation as a formal strategy.   This book is a description of Luwo, a Western Nilotic language of South Sudan. In Insights into Nilo-Saharan Language, History and Culture. Proceedings of the IX. Nilo-Saharan Linguistics Colloquium, Morphosyntax of Luwo. In Descriptive Studies of Nilotic Morphosyntax, O. Hieda (ed), :


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Nilo-Saharan language studies Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nilo-Saharan languages, a group of languages that form one of the four language stocks or families on the African continent, the others being Afro-Asiatic, Khoisan, and Niger-Congo. The Nilo-Saharan languages are presumed to be descended from a common ancestral language and, therefore, to be.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50–60 million Nilotic people, mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers, including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of the Nile languages extend through 17 nations in the northern half of Africa: from Algeria to Benin in west; from Libya to the Democratic Republic of Geographic distribution: Central and East Africa.

The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50 million people, mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers (hence the term "Nilo-"), including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of Nile languages extend through 17 nations in the northern half of Africa: from Mali in the west; to Benin, Nigeria and the Democratic.

Sudan is home to a lot of non-semitic languages that are often grouped under the umbrella term of "nilo-saharan" languages (e.g. fur, tama, zaghawa) [*]. I'd like to learn more about these languages: their salient grammatical features, the relationships they entertain.

Areal Contact in Nilo-Saharan; The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. The Cambridge Handbook of Areal Linguistics.

Nuba Mountain Language Studies, pp. Cited by: in the literature, but probably quite common in Nilo-Saharan as well as other language families, is the derivation of verbs from ideophonic adverbs.

One common strategy in Kanuri (and otherAuthor: Gerrit Jan Dimmendaal. The Nilo-Saharan languages are a proposed family of African languages spoken by some 50–60 million people in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers, including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of the Nile languages extend through 17 nations in the northern half of Africa: from Algeria to Benin in the west; as indicated by its hyphenated name, Nilo-Saharan is a.

This thesis investigates the grammar of Gaahmg, a Nilo-Saharan, Eastern Sudanic language spoken in the Blue Nile Province of North Sudan. The comprehensive description provides an analysis of the. Majang phonology and morphology, Nilo-Saharan language studies, M.

Lionel Bender, ed., East Lansing, MI: African Studies Center, Michigan State University. The origin of Amharic. Journal of the Institute of Language Studies Proto-Koman phonology and. This book is an introduction to African languages and linguistics, covering typology, structure and sociolinguistics.

The twelve chapters are written by a team of fifteen eminent Africanists, and their topics include the four major language groupings (Niger-Congo, Nilo-Saharan, Afroasiatic and Khoisan), the core areas of modern theoretical linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax), typology 4/5(1).

Nilo-Saharan. Genetic studies of Nilo-Saharan-speaking populations are in general agreement with archaeological evidence and linguistic studies that argue for a Nilo-Saharan homeland in eastern Sudan before BCE, with subsequent migration events northward to the eastern Sahara, westward to the Chad Basin, and southeastward into Kenya and.

Bantu languages, a group of some languages belonging to the Bantoid subgroup of the Benue-Congo branch of the Niger-Congo language family. The Bantu languages are spoken in a very large area, including most of Africa from southern Cameroon eastward to Kenya and southward to the southernmost tip of the continent.

Twelve Bantu languages are. on Bible translations into the Kunama language from until the ’s. August Andersson also published ethnographical articles on the Kunama people (Andersson ).

David E. Thompson contributed an article on Kunama phonology and noun phrases in the monograph Nilo-Saharan Language Studies, edited by Lionel M. Bender in   I do not consider Nilo-Saharan to be even nearly a proven family.

Just because of occasional vocabulary similarities, they are in general too few, like what can happen when you compare any unrelated language families. A few similarities can seem s. This book shows that such similarities across African languages are more common than is widely believed.

It provides a broad perspective on Africa as a linguistic area, as well as an analysis of specific linguistic regions. Nilo-Saharan Language Studies. Michigan: African Studies Center.

Bender, M. Lionel (ed.) Topics in Nilo-Saharan. Previous studies. Much foundational fieldwork and analysis of Surmic languages was done by Harold C. Fleming and M. Bender. The most complete descriptions of Ethiopian Surmic languages are of Murle (Arensen ) and Tirma (Bryant ).

All Surmic languages are presumed to be tonal, have implosive consonants, and have distinctive vowel phic distribution: southwestern Ethiopia. Synonyms for Nilo-Saharan language in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Nilo-Saharan language. 1 synonym for Nilo-Saharan language: Nilo-Saharan.

What are synonyms for Nilo-Saharan language. Nilo-Saharan Historical Linguistics “Language Contacts in Nilo-Saharan Prehistory.” In Henning Andersen (ed.), Language Contacts in Prehistory: Studies in Stratigraphy, pp. Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins Publishing Company, “Do Krongo and Shabo Belong in Nilo-Saharan?”.

The classification of the Meroitic language was uncertain due to the scarcity of data and difficulty in interpreting it. Since the alphabet was deciphered init has been proposed that Meroitic is related to the Nubian languages and similar languages of the Nilo-Saharan phylum.

The competing claim is that Meroitic is a member of the ISO xmr. Smagina’s The Old Nubian Language provides an excellent first introduction into the grammar of this medieval Nilo-Saharan language.

José Andrés Alonso de la Fuente graduated from the Complutense University of Madrid with a major in Slavic Studies. After various stays in Germany, France, Poland, and Finland, he became interested in the.Each of these articles adds significant detail to what had previously been published on the language in question.

This book is an important contribution to Nilo-Saharan studies and will undoubtedly influence the direction of new research on Surmic languages for years to : Edward J. Vajda. This book is about history and the practical power of language to reveal historical change. Christopher Ehret offers a methodological guide to applying language evidence in historical studies.

He demonstrates how these methods allow us not only to recover the histories of time periods and places poorly served by written documentation, but also to enrich our understanding of well .